A common additive, created by fermenting glucose with Xanthomonas campestris, a species of bacteria. Manufacturers sometimes refer to xanthan gum as simply xanthan.

Xanthan gum is often used in personal lubricant formulas as a thickening agent. It can cause topical irritation and other minor symptoms for people with corn or wheat allergies. However, small amounts of xanthan gum are typically safe; there is no evidence to suggest that xanthan gum increases users’ risks of yeast infections or other common bacterial/fungal health issues.